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A Point-of-Purchase Intervention Featuring In-Person Supermarket Education Affects Healthful Food Purchases

  • Author Footnotes
    † Dr. Brandy-Joe Milliron and Dr. Kathleen Woolf were both affiliated with the College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Nutrition Program, Arizona State University at the time this study was completed.
    Brandy-Joe Milliron
    Correspondence
    Address for correspondence: Brandy-Joe Milliron, PhD, Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157; Phone: (336) 716-6970; Fax: (336) 716-7554
    Footnotes
    † Dr. Brandy-Joe Milliron and Dr. Kathleen Woolf were both affiliated with the College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Nutrition Program, Arizona State University at the time this study was completed.
    Affiliations
    Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    † Dr. Brandy-Joe Milliron and Dr. Kathleen Woolf were both affiliated with the College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Nutrition Program, Arizona State University at the time this study was completed.
    Kathleen Woolf
    Footnotes
    † Dr. Brandy-Joe Milliron and Dr. Kathleen Woolf were both affiliated with the College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Nutrition Program, Arizona State University at the time this study was completed.
    Affiliations
    Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, New York University, New York, NY
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    ‡ Dr. Bradley M. Appelhans was affiliated with the Department of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Arizona College of Medicine–Phoenix at the time this study was completed.
    Bradley M. Appelhans
    Footnotes
    ‡ Dr. Bradley M. Appelhans was affiliated with the Department of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Arizona College of Medicine–Phoenix at the time this study was completed.
    Affiliations
    Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    † Dr. Brandy-Joe Milliron and Dr. Kathleen Woolf were both affiliated with the College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Nutrition Program, Arizona State University at the time this study was completed.
    ‡ Dr. Bradley M. Appelhans was affiliated with the Department of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Arizona College of Medicine–Phoenix at the time this study was completed.
Published:November 21, 2011DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2011.05.016

      Abstract

      Objective

      This study tested the efficacy of a multicomponent supermarket point-of-purchase intervention featuring in-person nutrition education on the nutrient composition of food purchases.

      Design

      The design was a randomized trial comparing the intervention with usual care (no treatment).

      Setting and Participants

      A supermarket in a socioeconomically diverse region of Phoenix, AZ. One hundred fifty-three adult shoppers were recruited onsite.

      Intervention

      The intervention consisted of brief shopping education by a nutrition educator and an explanation and promotion of a supermarket point-of-purchase healthful shopping program that included posted shelf signs identifying healthful foods, sample shopping lists, tips, and signage.

      Main Outcome Measures

      Outcomes included purchases of total, saturated, and trans fat (grams/1,000 kcal), and fruits, vegetables, and dark-green/yellow vegetables (servings/1,000 kcal) derived through nutritional analysis of participant shopping baskets.

      Analysis

      Analysis of covariance compared the intervention and control groups on food purchasing patterns while adjusting for household income.

      Results

      The intervention resulted in greater purchasing of fruit and dark-green/yellow vegetables. No other group differences were observed.

      Conclusions and Implications

      Long-term evaluations of supermarket interventions should be conducted to improve the evidence base and to determine the potential for influence on food choices associated with decreased chronic disease incidence.

      Key Words

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