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Impact of the Harvest of the Month Program on Low-Income Hmong and White Middle School Students

      Increases in the prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents are a significant health concern in the United States (US).

      United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents: United States, trends 1963-1965 through 2007-2008. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hestat/obesity_child_07_08/obesity_child_07_08.htm. Accessed February 25, 2011.

      • Reilly J.
      Childhood obesity: an overview.
      California is home to the largest Asian population in the US.
      US Census Bureau
      The Asian Population: 2000.
      Children from low-income Asian and Pacific Islander American families are joining other racial/ethnic groups in the obesity epidemic.
      US Census Bureau
      The Asian Population: 2000.
      Specifically, there is a growing body of evidence that obesity rates are higher among Hmong youth than the national averages for Asian or non-Hispanic white middle school-age children.
      • Stang J.
      • Kong A.
      • Story M.
      • Eisenberg M.
      • Neumark-Sztainer D.
      Food and weight-related patterns and behaviors of Hmong adolescents.
      Approximately 24% of the Hmong population in the US resides in California. They are typically first-generation refugees from Southeast Asia, and 55% are under the age of 18.
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      References

      1. United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents: United States, trends 1963-1965 through 2007-2008. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hestat/obesity_child_07_08/obesity_child_07_08.htm. Accessed February 25, 2011.

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      2. Links to California Content Standards. Harvest of the Month Web site. http://www.harvestofthemonth.com/EdCorner/content-standards.asp. Accessed February 25, 2011.

      3. Content Standards. California State Board of Education Web site. http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/. Accessed February 25, 2011.

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