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Relevance and Appropriateness of ¡Salud! Comiendo en Familia, an Obesity Early Prevention Program for Hispanics

      Objective

      The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relevance and appropriateness of a nutrition program tailored to improve eating behavior of Hispanic adults to early prevent obesity in this particularly at-risk population.

      Study Design, Setting, Participants, and Intervention

      A convenience sample of Hispanic adults (n=11; 9 Mexican, 2 Costa Rican) at a WIC clinic with 5-year-old or younger children at home. Five independent sessions delivered weekly at the WIC clinic with immediate post-session evaluation and post-6 session focus group. Delivered in a round-table style, each session included lecture, discussion, activities, and goal setting to address knowledge, self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, and impediments related to healthy eating. An expert panel validated program content. Survey and focus group data was triangulated for internal reliability.

      Outcome, Measures and Analysis

      Relevance and appropriateness as measured by time, length, topic, session components, and cultural perspective questions through survey and focus group data.

      Results

      Participants felt there was new information in most sessions; length and time were appropriate; emotion-based messages and discussion components were highly valued; activities improved understanding and self-efficacy; favorite activities were those related to the plate method and reading food labels; suggestions of adding exercise into the program appeared consistently throughout the conversation.

      Conclusions and Implications

      The theory-framed, expert validated program ¡Salud! Comiendo en Familia, is culturally relevant and attractive as revealed by participants. This program represents a potentially effective tool for helping Hispanic adults to become a role model of healthy eating for the youngest at home.

      Funding

      Christopher Family Foundation of the Family Resiliency Center's Food and Family Program, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign