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Obesity Risk, Parenting and Diet Quality Tools for Hispanic Families with Preschoolers: EFNEP, Head Start, Medical Clinic-Year 2

      Objective

      Produce final versions of two validated obesity risk assessment tools for Spanish speaking parents; assess feasibility of these tools to the child's physician; develop and validate a diet quality tool; and determine feasibility of an EFNEP intervention in a medical clinic.

      Description

      Protocol development, enrollment and data collection commenced in year 2 to validate the Spanish obesity risk assessment tools using: parental surveys; 24-hour dietary, sleep, activity logs; anthropometric and biomarker measures; and mealtime video recordings. The 23-item diet quality tool in English and Spanish was tested for face and content validity. The EFNEP intervention protocol, education materials including motivational modeling were finalized, a bilingual educator was trained, and an information kiosk is ready for pilot testing.

      Evaluation

      To date, recruitment has focused on eight Head Start sites with a total of 110 Spanish speaking parent-child pairs enrolled with a sub-sample (n=24) completing mealtime videotaping. Preliminary analyses of the glucose and lipid profiles show that the child metabolic data are positively associated with BMI percentile. Physicians (n=38) from four medical clinics have generated 198 patient referrals for the EFNEP intervention. Parents (n=39) have been enrolled in the intervention which required 584 phone calls and 368 texts. Sixty-five percent of parents stated that the physician referral was an important reason for enrolling and most parents and physicians report value from the intervention.

      Conclusions and Implications

      Validation of two pediatric obesity risk assessment tools and one diet quality tool are underway. An EFNEP intervention is demonstrating feasibility at a medical clinic site yet challenges remain in garnering physician referrals. Outcomes may contribute to the identification of young children more likely to become obese.

      Funding

      2015-68001-23280

      Supplementary data