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“Get Fruved”: the RCT Year

      Objective: To describe the Get Fruved project through year 04.
      Description: Get Fruved is a health promotion intervention utilizing Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) to develop and test a social marketing and environmental change intervention to prevent unwanted weight gain among older adolescents. Initially this included college campus students and then transitioned to college students mentoring high school students with the aim of conducting the intervention at the high school level. The five-year project has five phases. In phases I-III the CBPR partnerships were forged, college intervention developed, college intervention feasibility/pilot tested, and a high school intervention developed. During Phase IV (year 04), the college intervention is being tested utilizing a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) at 31 intervention and 32 control colleges and the high school intervention is being feasibility/pilot tested at five schools from four states.
      Evaluation: To date, 8,215 college students and 1,387 high school students have completed assessments. Prevention of unwanted weight gain is the primary outcome for the RCT, but since the intervention focused not on weight and instead on health-related behaviors associated with obesity prevention, numerous health-related behaviors were assessed. Assessments include dietary intake, stress, physical activity, sleep hours, perceptions of the campus environment, readiness to change, and students' priorities.
      Conclusions and Implications: To date, 16 new instruments/methods have been developed and validated, three college courses created, 91 presentations conducted, three manuscripts published, and college and high school toolkits created (providing a systematic approach to promoting health for obesity prevention). Data are currently being analyzed. In Phase V, high school intervention effectiveness will be tested using an RCT model.
      Funding: 2014-67001-21851.

      Supplementary Data

      The following is the supplementary data to this article: