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Walk Indoors! With Leslie Sansone

      Research has shown that shortening nutrition education classes by 15–20 minutes to allow time for integrating physical activity can help participants to improve their fitness levels without compromising dietary behavior outcomes.
      • Palmer-Keenan D
      • Corda K
      Should physical activity be included in nutrition education? A comparison of nutrition outcomes with and without in-class activities.
      The data are intriguing and suggest that nutrition educators should consider setting aside a portion of class time to engage participants in exercise, but some may wonder where to start.
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      REFERENCE

        • Palmer-Keenan D
        • Corda K
        Should physical activity be included in nutrition education? A comparison of nutrition outcomes with and without in-class activities.
        J Extension. 2014; 52: 4FEA8