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Moving On!: A Transition Program for Promoting Healthy Eating and an Active Lifestyle Among Student-Athletes After College

Published:September 28, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2018.08.004
      Currently, nearly 500,000 young adults participate in collegiate athletics in the US, and the vast majority transition out of competitive sports at the end of their college careers.
      National Collegiate Athletic Association
      2017–2018 guide to the college-bound student-athletes.
      This transition can be difficult because often student-athletes are not prepared to leave the athletic life.
      • Park S
      • Lavallee D
      • Tod D
      Athletes’ career transition out of sport: a systematic review.
      • Stambulova N
      • Alfermann D
      • Statler T
      • Côté J
      ISSP position stand: career development and transitions of athletes.
      In particular, student-athletes experience a unique transition from daily training and competition to a normal life without structured schedules previously managed externally by coaches and other athletic department personnel. Recently, there has been increased attention to helping student-athletes prepare for transitioning to a healthy lifestyle.
      • Sorenson SC
      • Romano R
      • Azen SP
      • Schroeder ET
      • Salem GJ
      Life span exercise among elite intercollegiate student athletes.
      Although athletes are often perceived as fit and healthy individuals, nutrition knowledge and awareness of healthy food choices among college athletes are poor.
      • Davar V
      Nutritional knowledge and attitudes towards healthy eating of college-going women hockey players.
      • Heaney S
      • O'Connor H
      • Michael S
      • Gifford J
      • Naughton G
      Nutrition knowledge in athletes: a systematic review.
      • Hoogenboom BJ
      • Morris J
      • Morris C
      • Schaefer K
      Nutritional knowledge and eating behaviors of female, collegiate swimmers.
      Furthermore, recent studies indicated that former college athletes may not be healthier than other college alumni.
      • Simon JE
      • Docherty CL
      Current health-related quality of life is lower in former division in collegiate athletes than in non-collegiate athletes.
      • Simon JE
      • Docherty CL
      The impact of previous athletic experience on current physical fitness in former collegiate athletes and noncollegiate athletes.
      Thus, effective interventions are warranted designed to address health behaviors among transitioning student-athletes. Moving On! is an evidence-based, behaviorally focused program that promotes healthy eating and physical activity among student-athletes transitioning into post-competitive life.
      • Reifsteck EJ
      • Brooks DD
      A transition program to help student-athletes move on to lifetime physical activity.
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      References

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