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Create Better Health: A Practical Approach to Improving Cooking Skills and Food Security

Published:November 21, 2018DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2018.10.006
      Low-income individuals are at a higher risk for food insecurity, certain chronic diseases, and poor dietary intake as compared to their higher-income counterparts.

      Gregory CA, Coleman-Jensen A. Food Insecurity, Chronic Disease, and Health Among Working-Age Adults. Washington, DC: Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture; 2017.

      As a result, it is essential that low-income individuals eligible for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) are provided with opportunities to advance their nutrition-related knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy.
      • Kaiser L
      • Chaidez V
      • Algert S
      • et al.
      Food resource management education with SNAP participation improves food security.
      • Rivera RL
      • Maulding MK
      • Abbott AR
      • Craig BA
      • Eicher-Miller HA
      SNAP-Ed (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education) increases long-term food security among Indiana households with children in a randomized controlled study.
      Unlike other federal nutrition assistance programs, SNAP participants receive benefits only once a month and have very few restrictions on what foods can be purchased.
      US Department of Agriculture
      Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).
      The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed) is available to help SNAP-eligible individuals make healthy food choices with their SNAP benefits, incorporate physical activity into their daily lives, and improve their food security status.
      US Department of Agriculture, US Department of Health and Human Services
      2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
      Developing and evaluating SNAP-Ed curricula remains important to ensure that curriculum content is evidence based, consistent with the most current Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and effective at facilitating behavior change among SNAP-eligible individuals.
      • Rivera RL
      • Maulding MK
      • Abbott AR
      • Craig BA
      • Eicher-Miller HA
      SNAP-Ed (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education) increases long-term food security among Indiana households with children in a randomized controlled study.
      • Murray EK
      • Auld G
      • Inglis-Widrick R
      • Baker S
      Nutrition content in a national nutrition education program for low-income adults: content analysis and comparison with the 2010 dietary guidelines for Americans.
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      References

      1. Gregory CA, Coleman-Jensen A. Food Insecurity, Chronic Disease, and Health Among Working-Age Adults. Washington, DC: Economic Research Service, US Department of Agriculture; 2017.

        • Kaiser L
        • Chaidez V
        • Algert S
        • et al.
        Food resource management education with SNAP participation improves food security.
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        • Rivera RL
        • Maulding MK
        • Abbott AR
        • Craig BA
        • Eicher-Miller HA
        SNAP-Ed (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education) increases long-term food security among Indiana households with children in a randomized controlled study.
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        • US Department of Agriculture
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        • Murray EK
        • Auld G
        • Inglis-Widrick R
        • Baker S
        Nutrition content in a national nutrition education program for low-income adults: content analysis and comparison with the 2010 dietary guidelines for Americans.
        J Nutr Educ Behav. 2015; 47: 566-573
      2. Coombs C, Neid-Avila J. Create Better Health: Food $ense (SNAP-Ed) Adult Nutrition Education Curriculum. Washington, DC: US Department of Agriculture; 2018.

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