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Integration of Interprofessional Education (IPE) Core Competencies Into Health Care Education: IPE Meets Culinary Medicine

Published:February 27, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2019.01.013
      “Interprofessional education [IPE] occurs when students from ≥2 professions learn about, from and with each other, to enable effective collaboration and improve health outcomes.”

      World Health Organization. Framework for action on interprofessional education & collaborative practice. http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/70185/WHO_HRH_HPN_10.3_eng.pdf;jsessionid=6D49C51C0113DC6AD5D6A6023F5188D6?sequence=1. Accessed June 11, 2018.

      To address the complex needs of today's patients, the Institutes of Medicine Committee on Quality Health Care in America
      Institute of Medicine Committee on Quality of Health Care in America
      Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century.
      suggested that health care professionals train and work as interprofessional teams. The Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel further quantified IPE, identifying 4 interprofessional core competencies: values and ethics for interprofessional practice, understanding roles and responsibilities of other health care disciplines, interprofessional communications, and teamwork.
      • Schmitt M
      • Blue A
      • Aschenbrener CA
      • Viggiano RT
      Core competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice: reforming health care by transforming health professionals’ education.
      Within the framework of these core competencies, the goal of IPE in health care is to reduce communication errors, enhance knowledge and perception of others’ roles, and improve coordination of health care goals within a team, thereby ultimately improving patient outcomes, adherence to guidelines regarding standards of care, and patient satisfaction.
      • Bridges DR
      • Davidson RA
      • Soule Odegard P
      • Maki IV
      • Tomkowiak J
      Interprofessional collaboration: three best practice models of interprofessional education.
      • Reeves S
      • Perrier L
      • Freeth D
      • Zwarenstein M
      Interprofessional education: effects on professional practice and healthcare outcomes (update).
      Although it is early to determine the impact of IPE conclusively, and evaluation is made challenging by both the complex nature of health care systems and variation in IPE endeavors, preliminary results suggest a neutral to positive impact on actual patient outcomes.
      • Illingworth P
      • Chelvanayagam S
      The benefits of interprofessional education 10years on.
      Accordingly, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
      • Hark LA
      • Deen D
      Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: interprofessional education in nutrition as an essential component of medical education.
      supports IPE in nutrition as a component of medical education and suggests that registered dietitians/nutritionists assist in educating medical students to improve understanding of the registered dietitians/nutritionists’ role in the care team. One component of IPE that has not been well studied is whether a nontraditional method of IPE in health care, such as a culinary medicine course, would result in improvement of student perceptions of team performance. The purpose of this project was to use a culinary medicine course to strengthen teamwork between nutrition and medical students, thereby providing a collaborative environment in which they could also develop a better understanding of the others’ respective scopes of practice and establishing groundwork for effective interprofessional communication though IPE.
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      References

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      3. Commission on Dietetic Registration. Essential practice competencies for the Commission on Dietetic Registration's credentialed nutrition and dietetics practitioners. http://admin.cdrnet.org/vault/2459/web/files/FINAL-CDR_Competency.pdf. Accessed February 24, 2019.

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