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Plant-Based Nutrition

      Diet, it seems sometimes, is the new black. We define ourselves at parties, restaurants, book groups, and lunch meetings with our current choices in paleo, keto, lacto-ovo-vegetarian, pescatarian, and flexitarian (the most confounding label of all, this refers to those who eat mostly plant-based foods but occasionally eat meat, poultry, or fish, too) or, more specifically by allergen-induced avoidances: gluten free, wheat-free, dairy-free, etc. Out with friends the other night, one diagnosed and definitively celiac friend was discussing with another, who works as a restaurant server, the frustration of those who adamantly order that gluten-free fare be specially prepared for them, and then follow that order with a request for a (yeast-based and therefore gluten-laden) craft beer. In a world overflowing with this kind of diet-based identity labeling mania, in approaching a book that is part of the Idiot's Guide series, it is hard not to expect more of the same.
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