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Hands-On Nutrition Education

      Research consistently shows that most people—whether medical students,
      • Monlezun DJ
      • Dart L
      • Vanbeber A
      • et al.
      Machine learning-augmented propensity score-adjusted multilevel mixed effects panel analysis of hands-on cooking and nutrition education versus traditional curriculum for medical students as preventive cardiology: multisite cohort study of 3,248 trainees over 5 years.
      • McGaghie WC
      • Issenberg SB
      • Cohen ER
      • Barsuk JH
      • Wayne DB
      Does simulation-based medical education with deliberate practice yield better results than traditional clinical education? A meta-analytic comparative review of the evidence.
      school-aged children,
      • Battjes-Fries MC
      • Haveman-Nies A
      • van Dongen EJ
      • et al.
      Effectiveness of taste lessons with and without additional experiential learning activities on children's psychosocial determinants of vegetables consumption.
      • White AA
      • Colby SE
      • Franzen-Castle L
      • et al.
      The iCook 4-H study: an intervention and dissemination test of a youth/adult out-of-school program.
      adults,
      • White AA
      • Colby SE
      • Franzen-Castle L
      • et al.
      The iCook 4-H study: an intervention and dissemination test of a youth/adult out-of-school program.
      teachers,
      • Stage VC
      • Bullard C
      • Hegde A
      • Jones L
      Teachers eating smart, moving more: impacting Head Start teachers’ personal health behaviors through hands-on, food-based education.
      or consumers
      • Gerstein DE
      • Martin AC
      • Crocker N
      • et al.
      Using learner-centered education to improve fruit and vegetable intake in California WIC participants.
      —learn and retain what they learn when they can connect abstract nutrition and cooking concepts (ie, lower dietary sodium, eat more soluble fiber, steam or stir fry) to concrete action steps through the use of experiential learning or “hands-on” nutrition education (HONE) methods. But for many nutrition educators, taking that step from teaching (ie, telling people what they “should” do) to HONE is not easy or comfortable. If only there was a simple-to-read, practical guide that helped us become more proficient at providing experiential learning activities!
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      REFERENCES

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        • Dart L
        • Vanbeber A
        • et al.
        Machine learning-augmented propensity score-adjusted multilevel mixed effects panel analysis of hands-on cooking and nutrition education versus traditional curriculum for medical students as preventive cardiology: multisite cohort study of 3,248 trainees over 5 years.
        Biomed Res Int. 2018; 20185051289
        • McGaghie WC
        • Issenberg SB
        • Cohen ER
        • Barsuk JH
        • Wayne DB
        Does simulation-based medical education with deliberate practice yield better results than traditional clinical education? A meta-analytic comparative review of the evidence.
        Acad Med. 2011; 86: 706-711
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        • Haveman-Nies A
        • van Dongen EJ
        • et al.
        Effectiveness of taste lessons with and without additional experiential learning activities on children's psychosocial determinants of vegetables consumption.
        Appetite. 2016; 105: 519-526
        • White AA
        • Colby SE
        • Franzen-Castle L
        • et al.
        The iCook 4-H study: an intervention and dissemination test of a youth/adult out-of-school program.
        J Nutr Educ Behav. 2019; 51: S2-S20
        • Stage VC
        • Bullard C
        • Hegde A
        • Jones L
        Teachers eating smart, moving more: impacting Head Start teachers’ personal health behaviors through hands-on, food-based education.
        J Nutr Educ Behav. 2018; 50: S113-S114
        • Gerstein DE
        • Martin AC
        • Crocker N
        • et al.
        Using learner-centered education to improve fruit and vegetable intake in California WIC participants.
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