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How Branded Marketing and Media Campaigns Can Support a Healthy Diet and Food Well-Being for Americans: Evidence for 13 Campaigns in the United States

Published:October 29, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2019.09.018

      Abstract

      This report summarizes the available evidence for strategies used in large-scale, branded marketing campaigns to promote healthy dietary behaviors to Americans between 1990 and 2016. An adapted health-branding framework guided the 3-step mixed-methods approach to identify evidence for campaigns using a scoping review, comprehensive literature review, and key-informant interviews (n = 11). Results show that industry, government, and nongovernmental organizations supported 13 campaigns that used various health-branding strategies. The authors suggest opportunities that may inform the design and evaluation of diet-related campaigns to improve understanding and application of health-branding strategies to promote a healthy diet and to advance consumer health and well-being.

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