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Enhancing College Student Recovery Outcomes Through Nutrition and Culinary Therapy: Mountaineers for Recovery and Resilience

Published:December 20, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2019.11.006
      Substance use disorder remains a significant problem among young adults (aged 18–25 years); 15.5% of this group needed professional treatment in 2015.

      Lipari RN, Park-Lee E, Van Horn S. America's need for and receipt of substance use treatment in 2015. In: The CBHSQ Report. Rockville, MD: Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; 2016.

      A substance use disorder occurs when the clinically significant recurrent use of alcohol, drugs, or both causes impairment such as health problems, disability, and failure to meet major responsibilities.

      Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Mental health and substance use disorders. 2019.https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disorders. Accessed September 19, 2019.

      College-attending young adults, including underage students, have the highest rate of alcohol and drug use compared with other age groups.
      • Koenings MM
      • Olfert M
      • Kattelmann KK
      • Nitzke S
      Pseudo-underage students’ access to alcohol surrounding three college campuses.
      Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality
      Results From the 2011 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Summary of National Findings. NSDUH Series H-44, HHS Publication No. SMA 12-4713.
      • Harris KS
      • Kimball TG
      • Casiraghi AM
      • Maison SJ
      Collegiate recovery programs.
      The stress of the college environment, as well as the social pressures of peers, may encourage college students to use substances more frequently.
      • Harris KS
      • Kimball TG
      • Casiraghi AM
      • Maison SJ
      Collegiate recovery programs.
      ,
      • Schulenberg JE
      • Maggs JL.
      A developmental perspective on alcohol use and heavy drinking during adolescence and the transition to young adulthood.
      It is estimated that among students attending any given college, about 4% are in recovery from substance use disorder.
      • Smith C
      • Christoffersen K
      • Davdson H
      • Herzog PS
      Lost in Transition: The Dark Side of Emerging Adulthood.
      For example, a college with 30,000 students would have approximately 451 students in recovery.
      • Harris KS
      • Kimball TG
      • Casiraghi AM
      • Maison SJ
      Collegiate recovery programs.
      Students in recovery can be defined assomeone who experienced significant consequences in at least one area of life due to a history of substance abuse and subsequently made a voluntary commitment, either before or after college, to maintain a sober lifestyle and engage in activities promoting sobriety and overall wellness.
      • Staton SC
      • Melekis K
      • McCarthy P
      A review of collegiate recovery communities and recommendations for implementation on a small residential campus.
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      References

      1. Lipari RN, Park-Lee E, Van Horn S. America's need for and receipt of substance use treatment in 2015. In: The CBHSQ Report. Rockville, MD: Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; 2016.

      2. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Mental health and substance use disorders. 2019.https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disorders. Accessed September 19, 2019.

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