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Encouraging Adults to Choose Healthy Now: A Hawai‘i Convenience Store Intervention

Published:January 02, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2019.11.016
      Convenience stores are an important source of food in lower income US communities, but they tend to carry more varieties of unhealthy options relative to healthy options.
      • Gittelsohn J
      • Laska MN
      • Karpyn A
      • Klingler K
      • Ayala GX
      Lessons learned from small store programs to increase healthy food access.
      • Zenk SN
      • Powell LM
      • Rimkus L
      • et al.
      Relative and absolute availability of healthier food and beverage alternatives across communities in the United States.
      • Laska MN
      • Borradaile KE
      • Tester J
      • Foster GD
      • Gittelsohn J
      Healthy food availability in small urban food stores: a comparison of four US cities.
      • Sharkey JR
      • Dean WR
      • Nalty C
      Convenience stores and the marketing of foods and beverages through product assortment.
      Healthy retail interventions seek to improve access to healthy food options and influence consumer behavior through the 4 P's of marketing: product, placement, promotion, and price.
      • Sharkey JR
      • Dean WR
      • Nalty C
      Convenience stores and the marketing of foods and beverages through product assortment.
      ,
      • Glanz K
      • Bader MD
      • Iyer S
      Retail grocery store marketing strategies and obesity: an integrative review.
      One strategy is displaying point-of-decision prompts (PDPs), shelf labels or signage at the point of purchase, to help customers identify healthy options and encourage them to make healthier selections.
      • Gustafson CR
      • Kent R
      • Prate Jr, MR
      Retail-based healthy food point-of-decision prompts (PDPs) increase healthy food choices in a rural, low-income, minority community.
      Healthy retail interventions have been implemented in a variety of small food-store settings throughout the continental US, including corner stores
      • Gittelsohn J
      • Laska MN
      • Karpyn A
      • Klingler K
      • Ayala GX
      Lessons learned from small store programs to increase healthy food access.
      and tribally owned and operated convenience stores.
      • Jernigan VBB
      • Salvatore AL
      • Williams M
      • et al.
      A healthy retail intervention in Native American convenience stores: the THRIVE community-based participatory research study.
      These studies documented increases in the availability and purchase of healthier food items by working with small businesses at the community or city level. This article describes the efforts of the Hawai‘i State Department of Health (DOH) to scale up the Choose Healthy Now (CHN) program through partnerships with 2 convenience store chains at a statewide level.
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