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Snack It Up for Parents: Brief Videos and Tip Sheets for Promoting Vegetable Snacks to School-Aged Children

Published:January 13, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2019.12.003
      National survey data indicate that virtually all children aged 6–11 years eat ≥1 snack/d, with nearly 80% eating multiple snacks.

      U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service. Snacks: distribution of snack occasions, by gender and age. Washington, DC: United States Department of Agriculture; 2018.https://www.ars.usda.gov/ARSUserFiles/80400530/pdf/1516/Table_29_DSO_GEN_15.pdf. Accessed November 27, 2019.

      Although snacks contribute nearly one quarter of children's average energy intake, the most commonly consumed snack foods fail to provide key nutrients, including fiber, potassium, vitamin D, and calcium.
      • Hess J
      • Slavin J
      Snacking for a cause: nutritional insufficiencies and excesses of U.S. children, a critical review of food consumption patterns and macronutrient and micronutrient intake of U.S. children.
      ,
      • Wang D
      • van der Horst K
      • Jacquier EF
      • Afeiche MC
      • Eldridge AL
      Snacking patterns in children: a comparison between Australia, China, Mexico, and the US.
      Instead, sweet and savory foods that contribute added sugars and sodium to children's diets are most commonly consumed.
      • Wang D
      • van der Horst K
      • Jacquier EF
      • Afeiche MC
      • Eldridge AL
      Snacking patterns in children: a comparison between Australia, China, Mexico, and the US.
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      REFERENCES

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      3. Folta S. SIU3 Video1 Nudge.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iaDPKg2z5hA&t=2s.Accessed December 16, 2019.

      4. Folta S. SIU3 Video 2 taste test.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z1CWfYAAwvM.Accessed December 16, 2019.

      5. Folta S. SIU3 Video 3 cook together.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m26JaGDDEd8. Accessed December 16, 2019.

      6. Folta S. Snack it up for parents.https://dataverse.harvard.edu/dataset.xhtml?persistentId=doi:10.7910/DVN/G0FHKR. Accessed December 16, 2019.