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How Sugar Affects Your Body. 2019

      Added sugar, typically in the form of sucrose or high fructose corn syrup, contributes an average of almost 300 cal/d for adults in the US, exceeding healthful recommendations.

      US Department of Health and Human Services, US Department of Agriculture. 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th edition. Washington, DC: US Department of Health and Human Services; 2015.https://health.gov/our-work/food-nutrition/2015-2020-dietary-guidelines. Accessed April 25, 2020.

      • Drewnowski A
      • Rehm CD
      Consumption of added sugars among US children and adults by food purchase location and food source.
      • Ervin RB
      • Ogden CL
      Consumption of added sugars among U.S. adults, 2005–2010.
      • Stanhope KL
      Sugar consumption, metabolic disease and obesity: the state of the controversy.
      Diets high in added sugar may directly and/or indirectly promote metabolic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
      • Ervin RB
      • Ogden CL
      Consumption of added sugars among U.S. adults, 2005–2010.
      ; however, this association is still controversial among researchers. Definitive studies on the dose-effect of various quantities and vehicles of added sugar are missing in the literature, and when combined with the null findings from some studies, the controversy further escalates.
      • Ervin RB
      • Ogden CL
      Consumption of added sugars among U.S. adults, 2005–2010.
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      REFERENCES

      1. US Department of Health and Human Services, US Department of Agriculture. 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th edition. Washington, DC: US Department of Health and Human Services; 2015.https://health.gov/our-work/food-nutrition/2015-2020-dietary-guidelines. Accessed April 25, 2020.

        • Drewnowski A
        • Rehm CD
        Consumption of added sugars among US children and adults by food purchase location and food source.
        Am J Clin Nutr. 2014; 100: 901-907
        • Ervin RB
        • Ogden CL
        Consumption of added sugars among U.S. adults, 2005–2010.
        NCHS Data Brief. 2013; : 1-8
        • Stanhope KL
        Sugar consumption, metabolic disease and obesity: the state of the controversy.
        Crit Rev Clin Lab Sci. 2016; 53: 52-67
      2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Know your limit for added sugars. 2019.https://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/data-statistics/know-your-limit-for-added-sugars.html. Accessed March 8, 2020.

        • Westwater ML
        • Fletcher PC
        • Ziauddeen H
        Sugar addiction: the state of the science.
        Eur J Nutr. 2016; 55: 55-69