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The Myths About Nutrition Science

      When I was a graduate student at University of California Davis more than 40 years ago, the late Victor Herbert, MD, JD, presented a seminar about nutrition quackery. Since then, I have been a loyal fan of Quackwatch and the National Council Against Health Fraud. Drawing on his extensive experience working with both of these organizations, David Lightsey, the author of this 12-chapter book, provides a comprehensive review of some of the most egregious yet long-standing myths about nutrition science. Unfortunately, many of these myths are as prevalent today as when Dr Herbert spoke out about them decades ago. For example, in Chapter 8, Lightsey effectively busts the myth that antioxidant supplements are “magic bullets,” and “synonymous with better health and prevention of disease.” Quoting Herbert, Lightsey writes, “Every [antioxidant] supplement so labeled is seen as having only an upside and no downside. This a myth. No supplement is pure antioxidant.” This chapter, like all chapters, first clearly describes the misconception or misunderstanding. Then extensive scientific information in easy-to-understand terms debunks the myth.
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