JNEB in the News

Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior press releases highlight articles that cover ground-breaking, original, scientific studies. Each release includes an audio interview with the author and full article links. All articles published in the Journal are subject to a stringent peer-review process. Please contact jnebmedia@elsevier.com to:

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Embargo Policy

All articles are under strict embargo until publication date which is listed in the release. Links in the release will provide journalists and editors with full-text copies of the articles prior to the embargo date so that stories can be adequately researched and written.


Lauren Haldeman named editor-in-chief of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Philadelphia, November 29, 2022 – Announcement follows retirement of Dr. Karen Chapman-Novakofski




Mothers' recall of early childhood feeding guidance from health care providers is inconsistent

Philadelphia, November 4, 2022 – New study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior shows mothers are least likely to recall being told to limit meals in front of electronic devices.

Lead investigator Andrea McGowan, MPH, discusses a new study that shows mothers' recall of early childhood feeding guidance from health care providers is inconsistent. For example, less than half of mothers surveyed remembered advice to limit kids’ use of electronic devices during meals.


Eating behaviors of parents play a role in teens' emotional eating

Philadelphia, September 7, 2022 – New study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior outlines what role parents can play in shaping emotional eating in their adolescent children.

Lead author Joanna Klosowska, MSc, Ghent University, discusses a new study focusing on adolescent vulnerability to emotional eating and how various feeding practices used by parents, such as restriction, food as reward, and child involvement, influence eating behavior.



Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior announces 2022 Best Article, Research Brief, and GEM awards




These awards were presented at the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior's 2022 Annual Conference, Re-engineering Nutrition Education and Behavior, July 29–31, Atlanta, GA. These annual awards recognize the authors of the outstanding articles in each category published in the prior year in JNEB, as judged by members of the Journal Committee and JNEB Board of Editors.


Education with goal-oriented activities motivates students to choose fruits and vegetables

Philadelphia, August 8, 2022 – New study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior outlines how both in-person and online students increased healthier eating after a semester-long nutrition course.

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"The study's outcome, which incorporated both in-person and online learning, demonstrates the ability to successfully connect with college students attending an online course and has important implications for nutrition educators.” Lead investigator Carol O’Neal, PhD, Department of Health and Sports Science, University of Louisville

Emotional patterns a factor in children's food choices

Philadelphia, July 12, 2022 – A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior could lead to obesity interventions that take into account the emotional contexts for unhealthy eating.

Lead investigator Christine H. Naya, MPH, Department of Population and Public Health Sciences, University of Southern California, reports on the results of a new study that looked at how children's unhealthy food choices, especially over weekends, are related to emotion.

Campus food pantries lead to healthier public university students

Philadelphia, June 21, 2022 – New research published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior outlines how campus food pantries have the potential to reduce students' food insecurity, decrease depressive symptoms and improve perceived health

Interview: Lead author Suzanna M. Martinez, MS, PhD, University of California, San Francisco, discusses the impact of the availability of campus food pantries on students at 10 University of California campuses. Results show how their use of a campus food pantry can positively affect their physical health, mental health and lead to improvements in sleep.

Obesity threatens US military readiness

Philadelphia, May 6, 2022 – A new Perspective published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior outlines the research and practices needed to combat the US obesity epidemic and its impact on military readiness.

Interview: Co-author Sara B. Police, PhD, Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, talks about obesity in the US military and how it impacts national security by limiting the number of available recruits, decreasing re-enlistment candidacy, and potentially reducing mission readiness.

Virtual cooking class improves children’s nutrition knowledge

Philadelphia, April 7, 2022 – A new article published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior highlights the benefits of a virtual cooking/nutrition program on cooking self-efficacy and nutrition knowledge.

Interview: Amy Saxe-Custack, PhD, MPH, RD, Michigan State University-Hurley Children’s Hospital Pediatric Public Health Initiative, reports on the benefits of a virtual cooking/nutrition program on cooking self-efficacy and nutrition knowledge. The program, Flint Families Cook, was developed by a team of local dietitians, chefs, and researchers. This article is the latest addition to the GEM (Great Educational Material) collection.

Weight dissatisfaction associated with discomfort toward school-based weight measurements

Philadelphia, March 8, 2022 – Significant associations between student discomfort and being weighed by physical education teachers were found in a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Interview: Emily Altman, MPH, discusses a new study that points to an association between how a diverse group of fourth to eighth grade students feels about themselves and their discomfort with the process of being weighed in school independent of the number on the scale.

Healthy Eating Determinants and Food Security Resource Opportunities: Urban-Dwelling American Indian and Alaska Native Older Adults Perspectives

Philadelphia, February 2, 2022 – The social and cultural value placed on sharing and supporting one another by American Indian and Alaska Natives can help improve healthy food access for older adults, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Interview: Urban dwelling American Indian and Alaska Native older adults face multiple layers of challenges related to social determinants of health that present barriers to healthy eating. Lead author Sarah A. Stotz, PhD, MS, RDN, CDE, discusses a new study that illustrates how the social and cultural value placed on sharing and supporting one another within these communities can help improve healthy food access for these older adults.

Healthful food for children is the same as for adults

Philadelphia, January 6, 2022 – Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior issues position paper on the detrimental effects of diets favoring “kids’ food” on children’s preferences and tastes, published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Interview: Lead author Pamela Rothpletz-Puglia, EdD, RD, discusses the new Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior position paper on the detrimental effects of diets favoring “kids’ food” on children’s preferences and tastes, and how nutrition educators play key roles in shifting consumer demand and social norms about food choices.

Family-centered nutrition influences diet behaviors for children with autism

Philadelphia, December 8, 2021 – Children with autism benefit from group-based weight management, according to a new article in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Interview: Lead investigator Brenda Manzanarez, MS, RD, discusses a pilot program that demonstrated how children with autism can benefit from group-based weight management. Children aged 7−12 years with autism and their parents participated in the Kids N Fitness© program developed at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles.

Social inequities perpetuate breastfeeding disparities for Black women

Philadelphia, November 8, 2021 – The institutionalized racism Black women continually experience has a direct impact on their breastfeeding rates and experiences, according to a new article in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Interview: Authors Melissa Petit and Denise Smart from the College of Nursing at Washington State University discuss the institutionalized racism Black women continually experience, which has a direct impact on their breastfeeding rates and experiences, according to a new article in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

Beyond childhood: Picky eating in college students

Philadelphia, October 7, 2021 – Self-identified picky eaters ate significantly less fiber and vegetables than non-picky eaters, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Interview: Lauren Dial talks about a new study of how picky eating in childhood can persist into adolescence and adulthood. Researchers reporting in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that college students who self-identified as picky eaters ate significantly less fiber and vegetables and reported greater levels of social phobia than non-picky eaters.

Many popular nutrition apps lack behavior change content features

Philadelphia, September 8, 2021 – Most nutrition apps effectively track dietary intake, anthropometrics, and physical activity but lack behavior change features according to a new study in Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Interview: Telema Briggs talks about a new study conducted at Rutgers University that assessed nutrition smartphone apps. They found an abundance of features dedicated to dietary intake, anthropometrics, and physical activity, but the apps are notably devoid of content features dedicated to behavior change.

Non-recommended milk being provided to young children

Philadelphia, August 6, 2021 – More than one-third of infant caregivers surveyed reported serving at least one non-recommended milk type to their infant in the past month, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Interview: Maria J. Romo-Palafox, PhD, RD, discusses a new study in which more than one-third of infant caregivers surveyed reported serving at least one non-recommended milk type to their infant in the past month. Factors such as the child’s age, household income, racial and ethnic background of the caregiver, and the product’s marketing claims were associated with which milk type the children received.

Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior announces 2021 Best Article and GEM Awards

Philadelphia, August 2, 2021 – The Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior (JNEB) announces the 2021 Best Article and Best Great Educational Material (GEM) awards, which will be presented at the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior's (SNEB) 54th annual conference, Raising Reliance and Resilience, held virtually August 8-10.


More than half of university students surveyed have tried a meat alternative

Philadelphia, July 7, 2021 – Top reasons for trying meat alternatives were liking to try new foods, hearing a lot about alternatives, and being curious, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Interview: Lead author Elizabeth Davitt, MS, Food Science and Human Nutrition, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, College of Human Sciences, Iowa State University, discusses a new study that determined positive environmental attitudes are predictive of plant-based alternative consumption among Midwest college students.

Consumers spent less on candy and desserts when shopping online

Online shopping was associated with lower spending on certain unhealthy, impulse-sensitive foods, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Interview: First author Laura Y. Zatz, ScD, MPH, talks about a new study that showed when shopping online, consumers surveyed spent more money, purchased more items, and spent less on candy and desserts than when they shopped in-store.

Many consumers misinterpret food date labels, yet use them with confidence

Philadelphia, May 6, 2021 – Misunderstanding food date labeling is common and educational communications are needed to improve consumer understanding, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Interview: Lead author Catherine Turvey, MPH, discusses a new study assessing how well consumers understand food date labels. Do they mean “spoiled - throw it out,” or “might not taste as good as it could anymore?” Results show misunderstanding is common.

Family child care home providers with high diet self-efficacy are better equipped to manage stress

Philadelphia, April 7, 2021 – For individuals who care for other people’s children in their home, building self-efficacy for healthy eating is an important component of health promotion and can buffer the impact of stress on their diet quality, according to the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Interview: Lead investigator Dianne Ward, EdD, underscores how important diet self-efficacy really is for family child care home providers for stress management and nutritional health and how professional nutritionists can help.

Virtual avatar coaching with community context for adult-child dyads

Philadelphia, March 8, 2021 – Virtual reality avatar-based coaching shows promise to increase access to and extend the reach of nutrition education programs to children at risk for obesity, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier.

Lead investigator Jared T. McGuirt, PhD, MPH, talks about the development of new a virtual reality avatar computer program as a way to get kids engaged in learning about nutrition education. The goal was to make this a program that could work to prevent childhood obesity

Front-of-package product names and ingredient lists of infant and toddler food can be hard to navigate

Philadelphia, February 8, 2021 – Disconnects between the front labels and ingredient lists of packaging containing fruits and vegetables make it more difficult for parents to understand what kind of food they are buying for their children, according to The Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier.

Interview: Authors Susan L. Johnson and Mackenzie J. Ferrante discuss how front-of-package product names and ingredient lists of infant and toddler food can be hard to navigate, and how nutritionists can help.

School nutrition professionals’ employee safety experiences during the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic

Philadelphia, January 7, 2021 – Attention to the safety and concerns of school nutrition employees is vital for continuation of school nutrition programs during the pandemic and future emergency situations, according to the The Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier.

Interview: Emily Vaterlaus Patten, PhD, RDN, CD, talks about a new study that explores real-time personal and employee safety experiences and perspectives of school nutrition professionals ranging from frontline staff to state leadership across the US during the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic.
What are schools doing to feed students during COVID-19–related closures?

Philadelphia, December 8, 2020 – nationwide assessment of child nutrition administrative agencies’ initial responses to meal service provision during COVID-19 pandemic-related school closures, published in The Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier.

Interview: Lead author Gabriella M. McLoughlin, PhD, talks about a new study that investigates the initial responses of child nutrition administrative agencies in all 50 US states and DC, 5 US territories, and the US Department of Interior Bureau of Indian Education as schools across the US are grappling with remote and hybrid learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

A brief pilot intervention enhances preschoolers’ self-regulation and food liking

Children who received intervention experienced significant improvements in behavioral regulation and liking of fruits and vegetables, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

Interview: Lead investigator Sara A. Schmitt, PhD, Purdue University, reports that an intervention using mindfulness training and engaging in classroom-based games can influence self-regulation and food liking for fruits and vegetables when introduced during the preschool years.

Are online grocery stores being designed to support consumer nutrition information needs?

Online grocery stores are becoming more popular and may affect the health and nutritional choices of consumers, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

Interview: Lead investigator Kelly Olzenak, MPH, RD, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, discusses a new study that examines the availability of nutrition-related information on leading grocery store websites.

Children’s pester power a future target for interventions

Children’s influence on their homes may be an underdeveloped potential target for future interventions, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

Interview: Lead investigator Taren Swindle, PhD, discusses a new study that highlights how children’s pester power may influence food consumption and habits at home. A future target for interventions.

Fathers are more likely to be referred for nutrition or exercise counseling

Overweight and obese men who are fathers were more likely than men without children to be referred for nutrition or exercise counseling, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier.

Interview: Lead investigator Alicia Boykin, MD, MS, discusses a new study that found that overweight and obese men who are fathers were more likely than men without children to be referred for nutrition or exercise counseling.

Engaging in family meals starts with healthy family communication

Patients in weight management or weight loss programs were more likely to eat family meals together when they had good communication and low discouragement at home, according to the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier.

Interview: Keely J. Pratt, PhD, talks about the first study specifically looking at family meal practices among adult patients enrolled in weight-management or weight-loss surgery programs and how engaging in family meals starts with healthy family communication.

Children don’t know how to get proper nutrition information online

Kids need to be trained on how to find child-specific information from credible sources, according to a study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier.

Interview: Children looking for health information online could end up more prone to obesity. A new study shows a lack of digital health literacy can lead children to misinterpret portions, adopt recommendations intended for adults, or take guidance from noncredible sources.

Confusing standards lead to extra sugar in kids’ breakfast cereals

Child sugar intake may be impacted by a lack of uniform serving size and standardized metrics for sugar content, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier.

Interview: Parents may let their children consume more sugar from their breakfast cereal than intended due to insufficient industry nutritional guidelines. Little improvement in nutritional value of cereals marketed to children despite 12 years of industry self-regulation, according to new study.

VA’s "Healthy Teaching Kitchens” benefit from holistic approach

The HTK program spanning 40 states helps educate older veterans on improving nutrition for healthy aging, and recent program quality improvement efforts inform HTK nutrition education by taking into account other issues facing older Americans

Interview: Investigators discuss how the Veterans Affairs’ Healthy Teaching Kitchen, an interactive nutrition education program offered by the Veterans Health Administration’s Nutrition and Food Services Department, is successfully addressing several aging-related issues like social connection, nutrition, and self-care.

Kids twice as likely to eat healthy after watching cooking shows with healthy food

A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found children ages 10-12 were nearly three times more likely to make healthy eating decisions after watching a television cooking program featuring healthy food

Frans Folkvord, PhD, of Tilburg University, discusses the results of a new study that found that television programs featuring healthy foods can be a key ingredient in leading children to make healthier food choices now and into adulthood.
Interview: Chelsea L. Kracht, PhD, discusses the results of a new study that found that only-children had less healthy family eating practices, beverage choices, and total Healthy Eating Index 2010 score, coming in lower on three out of the 12 areas measured.

Urban, home gardens could help curb food insecurity, health problems – “It’s changed our way of eating a lot”: participants cited pride in their garden work as a key factor in eating the healthier produce they grew, leading to an increase in healthy eating and physical activity

Philadelphia, October 7, 2019 – Food deserts are an increasingly recognized problem in the United States, but a new study from the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, indicates urban and home gardens – combined with nutrition education – could be a path toward correcting that disadvantage.

Interview: Food deserts are an increasingly recognized problem in the United States, but a new study from JNEB indicates urban and home gardens – combined with nutrition education – could be a path toward correcting that disadvantage. Lead author Kartika Palar, PhD, discusses new research.

Offering children a variety of vegetables increases acceptance – Variety is key to helping children form preferences for vegetables, according to a new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Philadelphia, September 6, 2019 – Although food preferences are largely learned, dislike is the main reason parents stop offering or serving their children foods like vegetables. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, demonstrated that repeatedly offering a variety of vegetables increased acceptance and consumption by children

Interview: Although food preferences are largely learned, dislike is the main reason parents stop offering or serving their children foods like vegetables. Lead author Astrid A.M. Poelman, PhD, CSIRO Agriculture & Food, Sensory, Flavour and Consumer Science, highlights a new study that demonstrated that repeatedly offering a variety of vegetables increased acceptance and consumption by children.

Becoming new parents increases produce purchases

Philadelphia, July 8, 2019 – In the United States, both children and adults eat too few fruits and vegetables, which puts them at risk for poor diet quality and adverse health consequences. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, found new parents increased their spending on produce in middle- and high-income households.

Interview: Although adult food preferences are considered relatively stable, major life events such as becoming parents may serve as a cue to behavior. Betsy Q. Cliff talks about a new study conducted at the University of Michigan that found that new parents increased their spending on produce in middle- and high-income households. The authors recommend further support to help low-income new parents increase produce as a part of their families’ diet.

A home-based weight management program benefits both children and parents

Philadelphia, June 6, 2019 – Obese children are four times more likely to become obese adults making childhood obesity a significant health threat. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, found the Developing Relationships that Include Values of Eating and Exercise (DRIVE) curriculum mitigated weight gain in at-risk children as well as prompting their parents to lose weight.


Teaching children to eat healthy: Repetition is the key

Philadelphia, May 8, 2019 – Early childhood is a critical period for establishing healthy eating behaviors, yet many preschoolers in the United States are not meeting dietary recommendations. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, found repeated opportunities for children to become familiar with the food without pressure helped them understand the benefits of healthy eating and increased consumption

Interview: Jane Lanigan, PhD, presents a new study that shows that child-centered nutrition phrases encourage healthy eating, especially when introducing new foods. Repeated opportunities for children to become familiar with the foods without pressure helped them understand the benefits of healthy eating and increased consumption.

Online tool encourages healthy weight gain during pregnancy

Philadelphia, April 8, 2019 – Excessive weight gain during pregnancy increases the risk of obesity in both mothers and babies. To avoid dangerous gestational weight gain, it is important to identify effective tools for behavior change. A new study appearing in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, found online diet goal-setting helped women achieve healthy weight gain if they started the study with a normal body weight, but it was not effective for women with a higher body mass index (BMI).

Interview: Christine M. Olson, PhD, discusses a new study that found online diet goal-setting helped pregnant women achieve healthy weight gain if they started the study with a normal body weight, but it was not effective for women with a higher BMI.

Eating healthy on a limited budget is possible

Philadelphia, March 6, 2019 – The affordability of healthy food is often cited as a barrier to low income families eating nutritious meals. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that with menu planning and access to stores selling items in bulk, the average daily cost for serving healthy meals to a family of four was $25 in 2010 dollars. This cost was consistent with the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) low-income cost of food meal plan, but higher than the cost of the USDA Thrifty Food Plan. The Thrifty Food Plan is the meal plan used by the USDA to determine food assistance benefits

Interview: Karen M. Jetter, PhD, talks about a new study that determined that families living in low-income households could create meals that meet the USDA dietary guidelines presented in MyPlate nutrition education materials.

Grocery-store based nutrition education improves eating habits

Philadelphia, February 11, 2019 – Hypertension affects over 60 million adults in the United States and less than half have their condition under control. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that grocery store−based nutrition counseling was effective in changing dietary habits of patients being treated for hypertension.

Interview: Rosanna P. Watowicz, PhD, RDN, LD, discusses a successful patient-centered medical neighborhood model in which nutrition education for patients with hypertension was offered at the grocery store, reinforcing dietary changes in the environment where food decisions are made.

Environmental sustainability should be inherent to dietary guidance

Dr. Diego Rose and SNEB Past President Dr. Adrienne White discuss this important new position paper from SNEB.

Interview: Dr. Diego Rose and SNEB Past President Dr. Adrienne White discuss why environmental sustainability should be inherent to dietary guidance, whether working with individuals or groups about their dietary choices or in setting national dietary guidance.
Nutrition educators identify barriers to physical activity and propose strategies to overcome them

Philadelphia, November 7, 2018 – Throughout its fifty years of publication, the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior (JNEB) has recognized the importance of physical activity as a key behavior helpful to achieving a healthy lifestyle. The November/December issue’s theme of physical activity highlights recent research on designing, delivering, and measuring physical activity programs for different audiences.

Work environment challenges nurses trying to adopt healthy behaviors

Philadelphia, October 8, 2018 – Research among nurses reports fewer than 10 percent meet physical activity guidelines and eat a healthy diet. The American Nurses Association underscored this issue by declaring 2017 as the Year of the Healthy Nurse. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that despite providing pedometers, a smartphone app, and access to a Facebook group, study participants were unable to change their diet and physical activity levels at the same time.

Interview: Luciana Torquati, PhD, discusses the results of a new study to evaluate and understand key factors to overcome the barriers to creating programs to help nurses change unhealthy behaviors.

Digital marketing exposure increases energy drink usage among young adults

Philadelphia, October 5, 2018 – Energy drinks represent a new category of nonalcoholic beverage with global sales of over USD 50 billion. Containing caffeine as a main ingredient, energy drinks are a central part of partying and sporting culture. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that digital marketing of energy drinks was more persuasive with young adults than other marketing methods.

interview: Lead author Limin Buchanan discusses a new study that found that digital marketing of energy drinks was more persuasive with young adults than other marketing methods. Engagement with digital marketing did increase consumption within this group.

Stress over fussy eating prompts parents to pressure or reward at mealtime

Philadelphia, September 17, 2018 – Although fussy eating is developmentally normal and transient phase for most children, the behavior can be stressful for parents. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that concern over fussy eating prompts both mothers and fathers to use non-responsive feeding practices such as pressuring or rewarding for eating.

Interview: Dr. Holly Harris discusses a new study that found that concern over fussy eating prompts both mothers and fathers to use non-responsive feeding practices such as pressuring or rewarding for eating.

Food insecurity has greater impact on disadvantaged children

Philadelphia, June 26, 2018 – In 2016, 12.9 million children lived in food-insecure households. These children represent a vulnerable population since their developing brains can suffer long-term negative consequences from undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that among these vulnerable children, food insecurity had a greater impact on behavior problems in young children of single mothers living in urban neighborhoods.

Interview: Dr. Christian King discusses how behavioral problems and poor cognitive outcomes may be linked to food insecurity in children.

Children can learn ways to significantly reduce salt usage

Philadelphia, June 7, 2018 – Consuming excessive salt during childhood is associated with cardiovascular health risk factors, yet the effectiveness of education- and behavior-based strategies to lower salt usage among children has not been fully researched. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that a web-based salt education program improved salt-related knowledge, self-efficacy, and behaviors among children ages 7-10 years.

Interview: Carley Ann Grimes, PhD, discusses a promising new study that found that a web-based salt education program improved salt-related knowledge, self-efficacy, and behaviors among children ages 7-10 years.